VOTES FOR WOMEN: A PORTRAIT OF PERSISTENCE

The River of Time Museum proudly displays this poster exhibition designed by the Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Service and the National Portrait Gallery in recognition of the 100th anniversary of the ratification of the 19th Amendment giving women the right to vote. 

The suffragette movement lasted over 80 years and involved thousands of women in every state in the Union. Leaders such as Susan B Anthony, Alice Paul, Carrie Chapman Catt, to name a few, struggled for years, giving speeches, attending meetings, rallies and marches, organizing and educating for a dream that finally came true in 1920. 

However, the women in Arizona earned the right to vote in 1912 as part of Arizona’s admission to the Union as the 48th state. But it wasn’t easy. Consider the fact that the population at the time was just over 205,000 spread over 114,000 square miles consisting of mountains, desert, valleys and forests and few roads or telegraph lines in which to convey messages or plan strategies. 

That did not stop Francis Munds and Pauline O’Neill. Even though they met strong resistance , Munds and O’Neill developed a strategy that worked against politicians who refused to endorse suffrage thus gaining the vote from all five political parties active in Arizona at the time. Francis Munds went on to become Arizona’s first woman state senator leading the way to today’s strong voter participation by women and, for the first time in Arizona, both Senators are women. 

Equality Is the Sacred Law of Humanity, c. 1903–1915
Ida B. Wells
Zitkála-Šá
Suffrage Pageant, 1913
College Women Picketing in Front of the White House, 1917

Posters

Click on each poster image to view the poster and use the links below to download for further details.

Download Posters

To view the posters in more details download using the links below.

Poster 1   |   Poster 2   |   Poster 3   |   Poster 4   |   Poster 5   |   Poster 6   |   Poster 7   |   Poster 8   |   Poster 9   |   Poster 10